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A Raisin in the Sun: Chicago in the 1950's/1960's
Abortion in the Black Community in the 1950's
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What was the attitude toward abortion in the black community in the 1950’s? Abortion in the 1950’s was illegal to black and white women. Most of the abortions that did occur were by the woman herself. Women of either race did not have a way of protection from getting pregnant because contraceptions were also illegal. In the 1960’s, contraceptives became legal. Even with this new law there was still demand of abortions. The women did not care to defy the law. There was a system set up called the “Jane.” This was an underground system were women were able to go to a telephone booth and find a number listed under “Jane” and get information for an illegal abortion to occur. This system also helped after the abortion with support for the woman. This system was occurring up until the Rowe vs. Wade case, when abortion became legal under certain circumstances.


Evans, S (2005). “Jane” [Electronic version]. The Encyclopedia of Chicago. Retrieved March 12, 2007, from http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/253.html
Holz, R (2005). “Family Planning” [Electronic version]. The Encyclopedia of Chicago. Retrieved March 12, 2007, from http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/
pages/253.html

ASUMH--Composition II, Spring 2007