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World Literature from 1660
Contemporary/Post Modernism
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Modernism
Da-Da
Da-da poetry: Kurt Schwitters
Da-da Poetry: Paul Eluard
Wallace Stevens
T.S. Eliot
Beckett: Absurdity
Contemporary/Post Modernism
Doris Lessing
Gabrieal Garcia Marquez
Alain Robbe-Grillet
Leslie Marmion Silko
The Enlightenment
Moliere
Moliere's Tartuffe
Swift
Swift: Gulliver's Travels
Pope
Pope: "Essay on Man"
Voltaire
Reading Assignments
Romanticism

In the contemporary/post modern literary world, the world has gone crazy. It has fragmented. There is no central element of faith, or hope for humanity, keeping a central concept of what it is to be human together.
 
The fragmentation results in nihlism--a depiction of a world ever spiraling out of control to dwindle to nothingness and end "in a whimper, not a bang."
 
Authors react by reflecting their own cultures and their own systems to both reflect and create a world that makes sense to them, a world they can believe in and hold on to.
 
Others give in to the mundane recording of mundane lives--acting as recorders, not interpreters, hoping that somewhere, something makes sense.
 
Much of this is affected by a sense of doom because man truly has created his own death possibility and can destroy the world--whether it is from nuclear fallout or global warming, the demise of humans seems imminent to many.
 
In a one world society, where media makes knowledge accessible at all times to all peoples, the authors become more and more reflective of self and the small worlds immediately around them. Gone is the scope of epic vision; instead, the microscope is turned to minute details.