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Philosophy
Social Contract: Thomas Hobbes
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Plato and Aristotle: Focus on the State
Social Contract: Hume
Social Contract: Thomas Hobbes
Hobbes' Leviathan, Chapter 13
Thomas Hobbes' THE LEVIATHAN, chapter 17
Thomas Hobbes' THE LEVIATHAN, chapter 19
Social Contract: John Locke
Eco-Feminism: Val Plumwood
Communism: Marcuse

To Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), man, in a state of nature, acts for himself against all others and only the social contract of forming government keeps peace. Left to themselves, he believed people would act on their evil impulses.

Hobbes' most famous work is Leviathan (the Great Whale) in which he argues that people were naturally wicked and could not be trusted to govern (anti-democracy) and that an authoritarian ruler was necessary.

Philosophy with dr.b